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's going on. also later, new warnings that the u.s. should be prepared to intervene in syria's civil war. senator john mccain now says he's deeply disturbed by the latest reports that the current regime in damascus is preparing to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction. year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are str
. . this is where the u.s. needs to stand firm. it's how we can stand firm for freedom. i encourage the passage of this resolution, and i encourage that we as a body will continue to stand for a free and open internet. and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to senate concurrent resolution 50. as many as are in favor will signify by saying aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair -- black plaque mr. speaker, i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to -- mrs. blackburn: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 and the chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
the u.s. not necessarily people but the education for producing. >> now, you see, i disagree with that. the skills are here americans can make these products. they can make them as good and better earn anybody in the entire world. we have a great skilled workforce. if they are not teaching some of those skills here, that's easy to fix. and way back in the days when i used to work with jerry brown, we talked about finding the skills that companies need for their special products, you know, computers or iphones or wind turbins or solar panels or whatever and making sure to be teaching those skills in our community colleges and vocational schools. you have to marry the two. but clearly, with that, americans can certainly do those jobs. but that's just one little point of difference here i think this is great news. let us know what you think about it 866-55-press. i will be damn honest with you. as a liberal and saz a progressive, i have been really feeling guilty about all of my apple stuff. i bought two ipads at christmas last year, one for each of our s
of strong missile defense, and more than any other senator he helped ensure that the u.s. had a working nuclear arsenal after the cold war had ended, because in his view, a strong america that can deter a threat is always the best avenue to peace. over the past decade jon has applied that same standard to the war on terror, and no one -- no one has worked harder to explain the threat of islamic terrorism or help equip our nation with the tools we need to confront and defend it than jon kyl. not enough thought has been given to the role of nuclear weapons in american foreign policy and how strategy will evolve as our conventional military is drawn down due to a diminishing investment and how nuclear weapons will be employed to support the articulated strategic pivot to the asian pacific theater. the senate and the country will be well served by jon's thoughts on these challenges over the coming years. fortunately, he's thought ahead by encouraging others to step into the void after he leaves. throughout his time in washington jon has been guided, as he explained in eloquent detail yester
to deal with john kerry, the personal envoy the president, rather than the u.s. ambassador there. his latest role had been that he played mitt romney in preparations for the presidential debates. some people said that the president didn't like the fact that he, kerry, was a little long-winded during those debate preps. obviously after the first one, president did pretty well. kerry obviously did pretty well playing romney. he will get the job which he clearly hungered for for some period of time. jon: there doesn't appear to be much in the way of republican opposition. senators like mccain, who expressed some reservations about susan rice have said good things about their fellow senator. >> absolutely. i mean, for good or ill, there is a senate club. he is a member in good standing of the senate club, well-respected and generally speaking unless there is some, you know, huge piece of information out there, certainly no reason to think of it, some controversial stand with john kerry i would think his nomination will sail through. jon: very often a president might pick a senator from a
announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause] many people have asked what went into this decision process and it was simple. he understands the strength need to have as we continue to focus on jobs. he has shown that with his support knowing the deepening needs to be there. he has shown courage with this fiscal representation. he knows the value of a dollar. he understands what every family in small business goes through. it also shows that this man of south carolina. he is very aware that what he does and every vote he makes a backstop carolina and our country. it is with that that i knew he was the right person. they understand that this is the right u.s. center for our state and country. it is very important to me as a minority female that congressman scott earned this seat. he earned this seat before the results he has shown. he earned this seat for what i know he is going to do in making south carolina and our country proud. with that i would like to introduce to you our senate select tim scott. >> thank you very much. this is a great d
again at those five most important words from my perspective in the middle of the preamble of the u.s. constitution, providing for the common defense, that we are doing that and exactly that with this measure. so i encourage my colleagues to support this conference -- the rule and the conference report that we will have and i believe it will be of great benefit to our men and women in uniform and to the future security of the united states of america and our allies and i thank my friend for yielding me the 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: mr. speaker, as we begin debate on this act, it's critical we understand just how important it is to our troops and to our country that we pass this legislation with a bipartisan vote. it's easy to get bogged down in partisanship on most issues, but this cannot be one of them. this legislation provides the men and women of our armed forces the necessary equipment and financial support to ef
.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
in u.s. military operations? guest: special operations forces have played an increasing role over the last decade, since they are designed to confront a regular presence of a wide variety, not only terrorism but insurgency, countering weapons of mass destruction and so forth, so they have a very wide mission. they have also grown greatly in the last decade. they are partly a number of about 33,000 uniformed badged special operations forces and they come from the navy, marines, army, air force. host: in terms of the budget, over the last decade, it was to $0.5 billion in 2001 during now it is in excess of $10.5 billion today. guest: that's right. the budget has almost quintupled. a great deal of that has also gone to the high end -- both the expansion and personnel, because people do cost money, the training and salaries for them, but also to a lot of this has gone to the high end special mission units and equipping them with state-of- the-art communications, stealth helicopters, a number of state of the art commands interest, also, the special operations command down in tampa, bef
in. where they're in a fundamental mistakes that the u.s. president made? >> you know, i think on the management of this issue like i said we almost ran into a couple of issues here. but we kept it on the road. i have to say, because you know i think about the last 20 years, 30 years of u.s. foreign-policy, in particular in the last 10 years. i to call it the disciplining impact of working within the alliance. we were genuinely, because this was an alliance, both on the negotiating side because in order to deploy in these countries, government suppression had to take ownership for the negotiation. they weren't going to be sitting at the negotiating table but there was a group that nato called a special consulted the group that enabled these people to go back, the governments in question and say you are part of this process. we are not we are not going to let those americans do these things and i have to tell you there were so many people in the reagan administration that were unhappy hearing the state department arguments over and over again. we can do that because it will disr
and coordinate, these things like nepa, environmental permitting so that all of the federal u.s. dot agencies can serve as a one dot agency and streamline and find that the processes and environmental documents can be conned currently delivered and accepted from one agency to another. they are good at it. we have found some efficiencies and streamlining. i think we can expand that to federal rail administration and continued to great success. the other issue we have had is needing consistence guidance from federal rail on the buy american program. we wholeheartedly agree with and encouraged by america, manufacturing created in the united states, and to continue to grow our nation's economy in that way. at we are in a transitional period and we've had some challenges in trying to get waivers for as much as five months on a cliff for a real-time. that probably shouldn't have taken that long as we're in this transitional period. so figuring out how to accommodate the goal by america but finding a way to get there in a transition period i think would be good. i know i'm out of time, or to enclose. i
, on the september 11 attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi that killed ambassadors christie and and three other americans. what the report told us was there were gross security failures in benghazi, that the mission was inadequately staffed and inadequately secured. and unprepared for the attack that happened. it assign blame to two bureaus -- the bureau of diplomatic security, the bureau of near eastern affairs, and the head of that board, former undersecretary of state thomas. and former joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen determine the blame should fall at the assistant secretary level, midlevel your credit manager. not political appointees. these are foreign service officers and government employees who had careers in the state department, positions of decision making. what is interesting is that only one official actually resigned, eric boswell, the head of diplomatic security. three other officials were placed on administrative leave. that administrative leave could go one of two leaves. it could be fired or fight for their rights and be reassigned. the point here is that the state
administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about th
questions from the audience. hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce this is just under an hour. >> thank you very much. thank you, everyone, for being here this morning. especially those who traveled to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect.
to think about a senate bill, i do believe in term limits. i guaranteed it in the u.s. house and i will certainly have a certain number of terms. in you start in the middle, where do you go from there? 12 to 14 years from this point is a good number. two full terms would be fantastic. but i better win the first one or the second one doesn't really matter much. [inaudible question] my understanding is january 3. >> [inaudible] what do you think you can accomplish now [inaudible] -- >> i think the first thing that i'll recognize is the south will become the entire capital of the country because i'll be putting more miles on my tires, because now i have two years to represent the entire state and get re-elected by 2014. one of the things i hope we work on from the senate will be the same thing that i worked on in the house, which is when you look at the problems of our country, they are simply spending problems primarily. we cannot address from congress many of the issues and challenges that really affect americans. that's something that starts at home. the things that we can affect i
and the accountability review board. the u.s. house of representatives committee on foreign affairs will hold a hearing on thursday, december 20 on the benghazi attacke. secretary clinton will be testifying. c-span will cover this on thursday at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. c-span cameras will be there. front page of the national journal this morning -- on tuesday he delivered the gop talking points about the need for more spending cuts as part of any deal, while downplaying the role of raising income-tax rates on wealthier earners, which the white house trumpets often. boosting rates on the rich, he said, would provide enough money to run the government for eight days. that has nothing to do with spending, getting spending in line. other than performing requisite task, mitch mcconnell has not emerged as a huge presence in the ongoing fiscal cliff narrative. that is a change from past budget and tax deals where his finger prints were evident, a fact that could affect the final outcome or subtlety of the deal. that the national journal reporting. paul is an independent in enterprise, alabama. go ahead. calle
. >>> a u.s. citizen has reportedly been arrested in north korea, unclear what his crime may be. state media reports that the man entered north korea as a tourist on november 3rd. he was detained and they discovered evidence of some crime that he allegedly admitted to. members of the swedish embassy, which looks after u.s. interests there, did visit him today. >>> a femme friend says ted kennedy jr. is seriously considering running. some democrats think kennedy's name and money could help him beat scott brown in a special electi election. brown lost his race for re-election, but many suspect he could get in the race to replace senator kerry if he heads to the state department. pro hockey season is wasting away before our very eyes, nhl canceled games through january 14th because labor negotiations have frozen over. more than 600 games gone. prayers may claim the lockout is illegal and sue the owners. half the season gone. >> fans just left. >> what fans at this point? >> we have all given up on these guys. >> john, thank you. >>> christine, what do you have in business? >> futures down 150 p
% -- 100% of u.s. taxpayers get a tax cut. above $250,000, people making more than $250,000 a year will be asked to pay a little more to pay for the fiscal soundness of our country, to pay for our country, the support of our troops. the pillars of security for our seniors. the education of our children. for the safety of our neighborhoods. this is just asking them to pay a little bit more while they continue to get the same tax cuts that everyone does. 100% of the american people get a tax cut, the upper 2% are asked to pay a little bit more. so i thank the speaker for finally at least uttering the words on the floor of the house about what is -- what the decisions are that need to be made. again, we committed to the cut. we acted upon the entitlements. the president has more in his budget. all of this would be a down payment for as we go rward into the next session of congress to talk about tax simplification and fairness, how we can have lower rates while plugging up loopholes and having a tax code that is -- encourages growth in our country. but that's along the scussion. as we
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
and a couple of pieces of legislation they have to do anyway. u.s. something all of us on capitol hill are dying to find out. when -- you ask something of a who worked on capitol hill are dying to find out. --the present's post office press conference, someone yelled, when are you coming back? we want to have the longest section possible. host: thanks for being on the program. we will continue talking about the so-called fiscal cliff with steven more -- stephen moore. we will talk about the author of columbine. we remind our viewers and listeners, on this week's addition of "newsmakers," our guest is eliot engel. he will be talking about some hearings over the past week about u.s. diplomatic security and a review board's report about how the u.s. and just an attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. it will be on tomorrow morning at 8:00 a.m. and at 6:00 p.m. on c-span and cnn radio. we will show you a little bit about what represented in glad to say. [video clip] >> the most important thing is to assure that no benghazi happens in the future. there were plenty of mistakes. in the futu
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
as the third longest serving member of the u.s. senate in our nation's history. he served as a defender of the people of this country, championing historic charges forceable rights, equal rights for asian americans, african americans, and native hawaiians. it is an incredible understatement to call him an institution. this chamber will never be the same without him. i remember in our childhood in hawaii, hawaii is a diversified place. where i lived, there were many japanese families that live around us. there were many nights i spent sleeping in the homes of japanese families. eating their food, sleeping on the floor. i was really brought up with the japanese families. when the war broke out, i couldn't understand what was happening. there were families that were removed from the community and at that time,but they pursued iy wanted to serve this country as well. this is why in my time in congress, i did focus on trying to help the japanese americans in this country and asians in this country. and to help them achieve what they really aren't. i remember seeking the medal of honor for th
of church and state. it's in the constitution of the u.s.s.r. it's not in our constitution. second thing i came here to the floor to talk about when the debate was raging was the ethical stem cell procurement. remember when george bush came to office, there was a lot of research in stem cells and we have been using adult stem cells but i'm probably the only member of congress that has a agree in advanced embriology and they thought there ought to be more usefulness in stem cells because they are pretty potent and will develop into anything. and get to adult stem cells that is differentiated and somewhat limited in what you can do with it. get these embryonic stem cells that were destroying the embryo. 40,000 embryos are discarded because they won't pay for keeping them. they are frozen and discadded and the argument is you can take one of these discarded embryos and you can crush it and get the stem cells from it. before you do that, you look at it under the microscope and there you see it, living tissue. gee, that might be the next albert einstein. when you are talking about collectively
from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> chase kowalski completed his first little kid's mini triathlon. he was a cub scout who played baseball, enjoyed the kids workshop at the home depot as well, 7 years old. injo injoining us now, dr. drew pinske. thanks so much. how important is it first of all for these other kids, nearly 600 of them, to get back into a regular school routine? >> it's very important, wolf, that these parents tell their kids that they're going to be safe and they need to
in the u.s. senate. maryland democrat barbara mikulski will become the first woman to head the appropriations committee, which controls the nation's purse strings. she's the longest serving female member of congress. she spent ten years in the house before being elected to the senate. >>> parents will soon have greater control over the personal information that can be collected from preteens on the internet. the ftc just enacted broader online privacy rules. personal information about kids under the age of 13 may not be released without parental permission. that includes the child's location, any images, or recordings. the rules are extended to users of smartphones or tablets. >>> and crews are working overnight to clear what's left from a deadly pileup that closed a major road on long island, new york. a 68-year-old woman was killed and 33 others injured in the crash. it's believed that a semi truck caused the pileup by slamming into a number of cars. the truck burst into flames. it was carrying away debris from hurricane sandy. >>> a dangerous snowmaker that slammed the r
bill in over 60 years and most substantial reform of u.s. patent law since the 1836 patent act. the lay lee-smith a.i.a. re-establishes the united states patent system as a global standard. over the past year the patent office has worked diligently to implement the provisions of the act to ensure the bill realizes its full potential to promote innovation and create jobs. the bill that we consider today includes several technical corrections and improvements that ensure that the implementation of the bill can proceed efficiently and effectively. the bill is supported by all sectors of our economy from across the united states, including manufacturers, university, technology, pharmaceutical, and biotech companies and innovators. i have also received letters in support from the coalition for 21st century patent reform which represents manufacturers, pharmaceutical, technology, defense companies, and universities. the innovation alliance which represents high-tech companies and license sure, and the b.s.a., the software alliance which represents a range of high technology and software compa
are not as bad with fiscal cliff. china not as bad as we though, u.s. very strong. so nike, if it goes back to 97, it means we're going to have a real bad couple of days in my view. look at red hat. red hat is a technology company that is deeply involved in the cloud. they, too, had a better than expected number, as did oracle in the cloud. so these are my two tales for the trading today, david. if you pick the best of the best and they go down, you'll really have a couple of -- >> when it comes to the so-called cloud play and the use of it in the competition here, is that one of the key names? >> yes, it allows you to manage cloud in a cheap -- an anti-microsoft business. their partner is sales force.com. i'm really using these as tells. in other words, these are the ones where there's natural buyers. as we just found out how good things are. it wasn't like we found out a month ago. we just found out last night. if they have resilience, the market is going to be more resilient than people think. if they give up the ghost, i think next week's going to be difficult, too. >> all right. we'll be wat
susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, withdrew her name as a possible secretary of state. hillary clinton is going to be leaving in january. she's moving on. she wanted one term and now the chairman of the senate foreign relathions committee, john kerr will be nominated. probably early in the afternoon the president will have a formal announcement asking that the senate confirm john kerry as the secretary of state. the hearings will take place in january. they would very much like to have john kerry in place as the new secretary of state around the time of the inauguration, january 20th, and they would then be able to go forward. for all practical purposes john kerry will certainly carry forward the foreign policy initiatives put forward by hillary clinton. they're on the same page on a lot of these issues but the president of the united states, as you know, carol, he determines u.s. international policy, national security, and john kerry will now have that mission. it opens up the senate seat in the state of maof massachusetts there's already been speculation th
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)